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- Basics -

Browser

My Web Browser

A web browser (commonly referred to as a browser) is a software application for retrieving, presenting and traversing information resources on the World Wide Web. An information resource is identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI/URL) and may be a web page, image, video or other piece of content.

The major web browsers are Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera, and Safari.

Platform

Platform

A computing platform is, in the most general sense, whatever pre-existing environment a piece of software is designed to run within, obeying its constraints, and making use of its facilities. Typical platforms include a hardware architecture, an operating system (OS).

The major platforms are Linux, Windows, MacOS, iOS, Android, Windows Phone.

Orientation

Orientation

Page orientation is the way in which a rectangular page is oriented for normal viewing. The two most common types of orientation are portrait and landscape. The specific word definition comes from the fact that a close-up portrait of a person's face and upper body is more fitting for a canvas or photo where the height of the display area is greater than the width, and is more common for the pages of books. Landscape originally described artistic outdoor scenes where a wide view area is needed, but the upper part of the painting would be mostly sky and so is omitted.

Portrait screen orientation can also be selected for computers, but was uncommon until the introduction of Apple's iPad, and the most popular use is in mobile devices. However, portrait is preferred for editing page-layout work, in order to view the entire page on the screen at once without wasted space along the sides, and for script-writing, legal work (in drafting contracts etc.), and other applications where it is useful to see a maximum number of lines of text. It is also common in public information displays.

Width

Visible screen width

In geometric measurements, length is the longest dimension of an object. In other contexts "length" is the measured dimension of an object. For example it is possible to cut a length of a wire which is shorter than wire thickness.

Height

Visible screen height

Height is the measurement of vertical screen distance.

- Additional -

Geolocation

Geolocation

Geolocation is the identification of the real-world geographic location of an object, such as a radar, mobile phone or an Internet-connected computer terminal. Geolocation may refer to the practice of assessing the location, or to the actual assessed location.

Geolocation is closely related to the use of positioning systems but can be distinguished from it by a greater emphasis on determining a meaningful location (e.g. a street address) rather than just a set of geographic coordinates.

Cookies

Cookies

A cookie, also known as an HTTP cookie, web cookie, or browser cookie, is a small piece of data sent from a website and stored in a user's web browser while the user is browsing that website. Every time the user loads the website, the browser sends the cookie back to the server to notify the website of the user's previous activity.

Cookies were designed to be a reliable mechanism for websites to remember stateful information (such as items in a shopping cart) or to record the user's browsing activity (including clicking particular buttons, logging in, or recording which pages were visited by the user as far back as months or years ago).

Online Mode

Online Mode

In general, "online" indicates a state of connectivity, while "offline" indicates a disconnected state.

Offline API

Offline API

Users of typical online Web applications are only able to use the applications while they have a connection to the Internet. When they go offline, they can no longer check their e-mail, browse their calendar appointments, or prepare presentations with their online tools. Meanwhile, native applications provide those features: e-mail clients cache folders locally, calendars store their events locally, presentation packages store their data files locally.

In addition, while offline, users are dependent on their HTTP cache to obtain the application at all, since they cannot contact the server to get the latest copy.

The HTML 5 specification provides two solutions to this: a SQL-based database API for storing data locally, and an offline application HTTP cache for ensuring applications are available even when the user is not connected to their network.

Touch screen

Touch screen

A touchscreen is an electronic visual display that the user can control through simple or multi-touch gestures by touching the screen with a special stylus/pen and-or one or more fingers. Some touchscreens use an ordinary or specially coated gloves to work while others use a special stylus/pen only. The user can use the touchscreen to react to what is displayed and to control how it is displayed (for example by zooming the text size).

The touchscreen enables the user to interact directly with what is displayed, rather than using a mouse, touchpad, or any other intermediate device (other than a stylus, which is optional for most modern touchscreens).

- New Features -

Storage

Storage (html5)

With HTML5, web pages can store data locally within the user's browser. Earlier, this was done with cookies. However, Web Storage is more secure and faster. The data is not included with every server request, but used ONLY when asked for. It is also possible to store large amounts of data, without affecting the website's performance.

The data is stored in name/value pairs, and a web page can only access data stored by itself. Unlike cookies, the storage limit is far larger (at least 5MB) and information is never transferred to the server.

History

History (html5)

Te browser location bar is perhaps the geekiest mainstream piece of user interface in the world. There are URLs on billboards, on the sides of trains, and even in street graffiti. Combined with the back button — easily the most important button in the browser — you have a powerful way to go forward and backward through the vast set of intertwingled resources called the Web.

File API

File API (html5)

HTML5 File API aspect provides an API for representing file objects in web applications and programmatic selection and accessing their data. In addition, this specification defines objects to be used within threaded web applications for the synchronous reading of files. The File API describes how interactions with files are handled, for reading information about them and their data as well, to be able to upload it.

Drag and Drop

Drag and Drop

In computer graphical user interfaces, drag and drop is a pointing device gesture in which the user selects a virtual object by "grabbing" it and dragging it to a different location or onto another virtual object. In general, it can be used to invoke many kinds of actions, or create various types of associations between two abstract objects.

As a feature, drag-and-drop support is not found in all software, though it is sometimes a fast and easy-to-learn technique. However, it is not always clear to users that an item can be dragged and dropped, which can decrease usability.

Web Socets

Web Socets

WebSocket is designed to be implemented in web browsers and web servers, but it can be used by any client or server application. The WebSocket protocol makes possible more interaction between a browser and a web site, facilitating live content and the creation of real-time games.

This is made possible by providing a standardized way for the server to send content to the browser without being solicited by the client, and allowing for messages to be passed back and forth while keeping the connection open. In this way a two-way (bi-directional) ongoing conversation can take place between a browser and the server.

- Media features -

Fontface

Fontface

With the @font-face rule, web designers do no longer have to use one of the "web-safe" fonts. In the new @font-face rule you must first define a name for the font (e.g. myFirstFont), and then point to the font file.

The @font-face rule is supported in Internet Explorer 9, Firefox, Opera, Chrome, and Safari. Internet Explorer 9+, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Opera support the WOFF (Web Open Font Format) font. Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Opera also support fonts of type TTF (True Type Fonts) and OTF (OpenType Fonts). Chrome, Safari and Opera also support SVG fonts/shapes. Internet Explorer also supports EOT (Embedded OpenType) fonts.

Canvas

Canvas

The canvas element is part of HTML5 and allows for dynamic, scriptable rendering of 2D shapes and bitmap images. It is a low level, procedural model that updates a bitmap and does not have a built-in scene graph.

The element is supported by the current versions of Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Internet Explorer, Safari, Konqueror and Opera. Older versions of Internet Explorer, version 8 and earlier do not support canvas, however Google and Mozilla plugins are available.

SVG

SVG

Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an XML-based vector image format for two-dimensional graphics that has support for interactivity and animation. The SVG specification is an open standard developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) since 1999.

SVG images and their behaviors are defined in XML text files. This means that they can be searched, indexed, scripted, and, if need be, compressed. As XML files, SVG images can be created and edited with any text editor, but it is often more convenient to create them with drawing programs such as Inkscape.

Flash Player

Flash Player

The Adobe Flash Player is freeware software for viewing multimedia, executing rich Internet applications, and streaming video and audio, content created on the Adobe Flash platform. Flash Player supports vector and raster graphics, 3D graphics, an embedded scripting language called ActionScript executed in ActionScript Virtual Machine, and streaming of video and audio.

Flash Player is certified to be supported on a select range of mobile and tablet devices, from Acer, BlackBerry 10, Dell, HTC, Lenovo, Logitech, LG, Motorola, Samsung, Sharp, SoftBank, Sony (and Sony Ericsson), and Toshiba. As of 2012, Adobe has stopped browser-based Flash Player development for mobile browsers in favor of HTML5, however Adobe continues to support Flash content on mobile devices with the Adobe Integrated Runtime, which allows developers to publish content that runs as native applications on certain supported mobile phone platforms.

- Sound -

Sound (MP3)

Sound (MP3)

MPEG-1 or MPEG-2 Audio Layer III, more commonly referred to as MP3, is an encoding format for digital audio which uses a form of lossy data compression. It is a common audio format for consumer audio streaming or storage, as well as a de facto standard of digital audio compression for the transfer and playback of music on most digital audio players.

Sound (OGG)

Sound (OGG)

Ogg is a free, open container format maintained by the Xiph.Org Foundation. The creators of the Ogg format state that it is unrestricted by software patents and is designed to provide for efficient streaming and manipulation of high quality digital multimedia.

Sound (WAV)

Sound (WAV)

Waveform Audio File Format (WAVE, or more commonly known as WAV due to its filename extension) is a Microsoft and IBM audio file format standard for storing an audio bitstream on PCs. It is an application of the Resource Interchange File Format (RIFF) bitstream format method for storing data in "chunks", and thus is also close to the 8SVX and the AIFF format used on Amiga and Macintosh computers, respectively.

Sound (AAC)

Sound (AAC)

Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) is a standardized, lossy compression and encoding scheme for digital audio. Designed to be the successor of the MP3 format, AAC generally achieves better sound quality than MP3 at similar bit rates.

- Video -

Video (MPEG4)

Video (MPEG4)

MPEG-4 is a method of defining compression of audio and visual (AV) digital data. It was introduced in late 1998 and designated a standard for a group of audio and video coding formats and related technology agreed upon by the ISO/IEC Moving Picture Experts Group.

MPEG-4 contains patented technologies, the use of which requires licensing in countries that acknowledge software algorithm patents. Over two dozen companies claim to have patents covering MPEG-4.

Video (h264)

Video (h264)

H.264/MPEG-4 Part 10 or AVC (Advanced Video Coding) is a video compression format, and is currently one of the most commonly used formats for the recording, compression, and distribution of video content. The final drafting work on the first version of the standard was completed in May 2003.

Video (OGG)

Video (OGG)

Ogg is a free, open container format maintained by the Xiph.Org Foundation. The creators of the Ogg format state that it is unrestricted by software patents and is designed to provide for efficient streaming and manipulation of high quality digital multimedia.

Video (WEBM)

Video (WEBM)

WebM is an audio-video container format designed to provide royalty-free, open video compression for use with HTML5 video. The project's development is sponsored by Google Inc.

A WebM file consists of VP8 video and Vorbis audio streams, in a container based on a profile of Matroska.[2][3][4] The project releases WebM-related software under a BSD license and all users are granted a worldwide, non-exclusive, no-charge, royalty-free patent license.

- Motion -

X 0

X

First coordinate from accelerator.

y 0

Y

Second coordinate from accelerator.

Z 0

Z

Third coordinate from accelerator.

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Main image taken from ARS Technica [Image link]

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